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Posts Tagged ‘Parminder Nagra’

From the Hootoo archive. Originally published April 18th 2002:

[Originally following reviews of The One, 24 Hour Party People, and Queen of the Damned.]

After two disappointing films and one absolute stinker, salvation finally arrives in the shape of Gurinder Chadha’s Bend It Like Beckham. (In light of recent events, perhaps Break It Like Beckham would be a better title.)

Jesminder (Parminder Nagra) is young British Asian girl whose main interest is football (soccer, if you’re a former-colonial), something which does not sit well with her traditionally-minded Sikh family. She befriends the like-minded Jules (Keira Knightley), who persuades her to try out for the local women’s side, coached by Joe (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers). But Jess’ family are firmly against her doing anything so outlandish and unladylike – will she submit to their wishes, or will she be able to pursue her dream of playing professionally?

Well, of course she will. I’m giving nothing away here as the plot of Bend It Like Beckham contains absolutely no surprises: you just know her parents won’t want her to play, but you’re also sure she’ll sneak off to play behind their backs… and so on, and so on. And so on, and so on, actually, because to be fair it’s about a quarter hour too long in reaching the requisite happy ending, especially given the lack of narrative invention. But the three young leads are refreshing and engaging up front, while Juliet Stevenson is a midfield powerhouse, getting most of the big laughs as Jules’ equally conservative (with a small c) mother. Anupam Kher is also good as Jesminder’s father, and Shaznay Lewis out of All Saints has chosen a rather better film than her bandmates to make her (admitted very low-key) feature debut in.

Claims that this is a Great British Comedy are perhaps a touch exaggerated, but it’s warm, feelgood, well-observed and deeply affectionate about its characters. I smiled all the way through and there are some very funny moments. Also impressive is the way it avoids the pitfall of coming across as a niche, ghetto picture (either as a women’s football movie or an Asian culture one). It’s simply a positive, un-preachy comedy-drama. It’s not going to outgross Attack of the Clones at the US box-office, but it’s still hugely likeable, for all that it’s cliched. A touching and upbeat portrait of modern Britain, this deserves to be a winner.

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