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Posts Tagged ‘Kim Ji-woon’

There comes a moment in the career of every bona fide screen legend – provided they live long enough, of course – when both they and their fans are confronted with their Norma Desmond moment. They may still be big and famous, but the pictures in which they are appearing have inexplicably become somewhat smaller. Not necessarily badly-made or objectionable, but just – small. Like, for example, Kim Ji-woon’s The Last Stand.

This film was allegedly written by someone called Andrew Knauer, but I suspect this is just a codename for a new software package which assembles completed screenplays from pre-existing bits of genre formulae. In Las Vegas, tough-talking FBI guy John Bannister (Forest Whitaker) is in the process of transporting straight-out-of-Central-Casting slimeball drug baron Cortez (Eduardo Noriega) to prison, when the villain executes a frankly ludicrous escape plan involving an electromagnet, a 200mph car, a small portable bridge and the Dutch national football team, and heads for the Mexican border at high speed. Only the small and sleepy town of Sommerton Junction stands between him and freedom, and the personnel of the sheriff’s department there are not exactly guaranteed to strike fear into the hearts of criminals. Well, with the possible exception of the sheriff himself, who is a big old lad with a funny Austrian accent…

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Yes, this is what I suppose we must call Arnold Schwarzenegger’s big comeback – although, as I’ve already said, this is not really what you’d call a major movie. If Arnie was replaced as the star with a less iconic presence you could quite easily imagine this going DTDVD, because the story really is slight and in many places rather silly.

It doesn’t help that the film really struggles to find a consistent tone throughout its first half – the narrative cuts back and forth between Cortez making his escape, and Arnie’s relaxed and somewhat bucolic routine as a small-town sheriff (it turns out he used to be a supercop in LA who’s retired to the sticks, of course). The former is glitzy and outrageous, and has a hard, gory edge to its frequent violence, which is very much at odds with the mildly comic and low-key material with Arnie and his various sidekicks. In the end the full-on violent stuff becomes predominant – if the intent was to strike a contrast between the two, it doesn’t really work, as there just isn’t enough small-town-routine stuff, and most of it is blatantly laying in plot for the second half of the film.

That said, the movie is competently executed and usually quite well played. None of the good guys or bad guys actually turn into what you could honestly call three-dimensional characters, but then again this isn’t the kind of film where you would expect them to (not that it wouldn’t have been nice if they had). The good guys are mostly quite appealing, with the exception of Johnny Knoxville, who plays an annoying, over-the-top character… actually, this is Johnny Knoxville we’re talking about, so you can take the annoying and over-the-top parts as read, obviously. No surprises there.

One thing which did surprise me was my own positive reaction to seeing Arnie back in action on the big screen. He may not open up at the bad guys with a Vickers machine gun or wrestle somebody off the roof of a building with quite the same speed or fluidity as back in his heyday, but he acquits himself very respectably. It’s easy to make jokes about Arnie’s choice of comedy roles or his political career, but this is a guy who made some absolute classic action movies once upon a time.

And his acting is certainly as good as ever it was – those familiar features reconfigure themselves to suggest Shock, Concern, Anger, and Determination much as they ever did, which is to say one is reminded of someone operating a slightly sticky gearbox. The big guy still has charisma by the bucketful, particularly in the climax of the film. There’s a bit where the villain has had the temerity to suggest Arnie’s past it, tried to bribe him, and then resorted to fighting dirty. Schwarzenegger, pausing only to beat him (somewhat laboriously) to a pulp, responds rather gently with ‘My honour is not for sale.’ And it’s a lovely moment, worthy of the genuine star he remains.

Now, the script here is brave enough to acknowledge not only that Arnie is an immigrant, but also that he is knocking on a bit, and it’ll be interesting to see whether his future projects continue to play with this. By the time Clint Eastwood had hit his mid sixties he was making films which engaged with and made use of his iconic status and history. If Arnie attempts something similar we could end up with films which are at least interesting – but, disregarding rumours of new Conan and Terminator movies (oh, Lord), the only leading role on Arnie’s slate of upcoming projects is in an Agatha Christie adaptation (he’s not playing Poirot, in case you were wondering).

Oh well, judging from this movie Arnie’s got quite a few more movies left in him (some of those will probably turn out to be future episodes of The Expendables, but you can’t have everything), and I’ve no doubt some of them will be enormous monster trucks of films of the type we would expect. The Last Stand is a much more modest vehicle, and hardly very memorable, but as a way of getting reacquainted with Schwarzenegger it does what needs to be done efficiently enough.

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