Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Alyson Spiro’

More than any other story in the series, Assignment Four of Sapphire and Steel seems to have burned its way into the minds of those who saw it at an impressionable age back in 1981. Even the most casual piece looking back at the series almost always refers to the one with the photographs and the man with no face. It’s easy to see why: with this story you do get a sense of a show hitting its stride and learning how to make the best use of its advantages.

This is another studio-bound production, set in a junk shop, the yard behind it, and a small block of flats above. Children are playing, but there is something curiously Edwardian about them – almost literally so. They disappear when Sapphire and Steel arrive, having been sent to investigate… well, some kind of time disruption, their information is limited on this occasion. Steel sourly assesses the junk shop, stuffed with old things, as ‘a room full of triggers’, recalling Assignment One’s idea of things from the past being weak points where things from outside time can break through into the present. Is that what’s happened here? Someone or something briefly manages to trap the two investigators – they refer to themselves as ‘operators’ here for the first time – inside photographs, which suggests a malign power is at work.

They meet a young woman lodging in the building, Liz (Alyson Spiro), who does not seem very impressed by them, despite another casual display of their strange powers (in this story they seem able to manipulate simple mechanisms and devices by a form of telekinesis – perhaps they acquired this from Silver, as there’s also a suggestion that in a crisis they can mimic the powers of their colleagues). Liz reveals the old landlord of the building was fascinated by old photographs – but she hasn’t seen him, or her fellow lodger, for ages. There is a new landlord now – but she can’t for the life of her recall what he looks like…

Soon enough the new landlord returns. The creepy children inform him of Sapphire and Steel’s presence, and he is neither impressed or intimated. At least, if he is, he doesn’t show it, not having an actual face…

As mentioned, there’s a callback to Assignment One here, but also to Assignment Two in the way the antagonist recruits shades or echoes of people from the past – not their actual ghosts on this occasion, but the images they leave behind in old photographs. This itself is a rather creepy idea, before we even come to the idea behind the Shape – a being that has somehow become inextricably linked with the whole concept of photography, capable of travelling through or manipulating every photograph ever taken. Of course, if the Shape has a wider agenda beyond simply causing chaos it is never made clear (one wonders just where he has been when he returns at the end of the first episode). Up until now, Sapphire and Steel’s opponents have always been rather abstract, but giving them an enemy who can interact with them (even break in on their telepathy) works rather well.

Another significant plus for this story is that it is one of the shorter ones, meaning that there is less of the obvious padding that has been there to fill out the previous stories. Four episodes (or about an hour and a half) really seems to be the optimum length for this kind of story, for all that longer outings may be less of a strain on the budget. I’ve seen comments that the conclusion of this episode feels rather abrupt – well, perhaps in some ways it is, but you can see why they cut it short before having to show Sapphire and Steel teleporting off to the other side of the world. Maybe the method used to neutralise the Shape is a little contrived, but given the vastly powerful nature of the character this was probably inevitable. At least the story’s end includes Sapphire and Steel’s chilling advice to Liz – to find every photo of herself ever taken and burn them all, and never appear in another. One wonders how she would cope with today’s camera-obsessed world…

Given how indifferent Steel in particular has been to human lives in previous stories, it is a little surprising to find the agents quite so concerned with the wellbeing of the Shape’s victims – both seem genuinely concerned and even outraged when he sets fire to a photo in which he has trapped two people, burning them to death. It is another surprisingly chilling moment, and again one wonders whether you could show something like this in prime time nowadays. Probably not.

In the past I have mentioned a couple of times the influence Sapphire and Steel had on a Call of Cthulhu scenario I wrote before even seeing the episodes concerned. I know that one of my players is familiar with the series, but otherwise I would certainly be looking to recycle bits of this story as a game scenario as well – it has a strong theme, an interesting gimmick, and a creepy villain. I’m not sure I would strictly call it Lovecraftian, though – the story’s references to different forms of art (as well as photography, the initial arrival of the Shape surely alludes to Magritte – if you google for ‘Magritte faceless man’, a still from this story appears!) and other imagery suggest to me no more and no less than the presence of Hastur, that most enigmatic member of the Mythos pantheon (though we are admittedly quite a long way from Robert W Chambers at this point). The situation in the story probably needs some modification, if only to prevent the Shape from TPKing the players, but this shouldn’t be too tricky to achieve.

Assignment Four is perhaps the most conventional story so far in Sapphire and Steel – it doesn’t have the longeurs of the first two, or the sheer weird angular strangeness of the third – but it manages to maintain the strengths of the series without losing the peculiar atmosphere which makes it so distinctive. It’s hard not to conclude this is the high point of the series.

Read Full Post »